Colored Ice Cubes


I reckon I’m all about making awesome things in ice cube trays lately.  Bristol is into solids now, so I’m making baby food and I have trays full of coffee cubes for my iced coffees.  YUM!  But I know that ice cube trays are meant to make ice, so I’m showing H20 some love today and making fun colored ice cubes!


Colored ice cubes make plain water fun for toddlers to drink, they make lemonade turn cool colors and -if you’re a cocktail hour type of guy/gal- vodka tonics are way more fun if you use colored ice.

These are -pretty much- just as they seem.  Color some water with food coloring (one drop goes a long way) and pour it into ice cube trays.



Once frozen, plop the cubes into a glass and be amazed at how totally rad (people still say that, right?) your bevie looks.




How To: Melted Crayon Art

Who loves colorful, easy artwork that’s fun to make?  This girl does!!  And I’ve been dying to take a stab at my own melted crayon art ever since the craze has become popular.  Let me break down the complicated steps of this highly difficult, skill-requiring craft: 1) Glue crayons to a canvas. 2) Use your hair dryer to melt them. 3) Hang it on a wall.

It’s pretty easy-peasy!  Here is a little bit more of a detailed break down for those of you who are wanting to do ‘the melt’ yourselves.

I started out with a 16×20 canvas and a box of 64 crayons.  The whole box won’t fit on the canvas, so pull out the colors you don’t want.  I suggest getting a smaller box of crayons as well, so you can double up on the colors you really want to pop (I didn’t do this…mine are strictly from the 64 count box, but I’m wishing I would have added more of the brighter colors).

You have a choice at this point; you can leave the wrappers on, or take them off.  Totally up to you what “look” you would like in the end.  If you decide to remove the wrappers, simply soak the crayons in a bowl of water until the wrappers slide right off.  Don’t try to peel them off dry…it’ll take you forever.

When you’re ready to assemble, use a hot glue gun to fasten the crayons to the canvas, tip pointed down.  Go ahead and snug the crayons up against each other.  No need to leave room between.Make sure to have your canvas propped up on a flat surface, placing plenty of aluminium foil (or newspaper, I suppose would work) around the area to catch splatters.

Using the highest heat setting and the lowest speed setting, fire up the hair dryer and make those crayons sweat!  The rest happens naturally…it’s a science I like to call “gravity.”

In no time at all, you’ll have a neat work of art!  This one is going to hang in Evan’s room.  I’d like to build a black frame to go around it, but that craft is for another day. 🙂